Crispy, Sweet, Addictive Roasted Chickpeas 

Ever have a ton of leftover chickpeas just staring you in the face every time you open the fridge? Oh boy, we do. We pressure cook a ton of these protein-filled babies to eat throughout the week in salads, with breakfast, and of course to make hummus with. But they’re like damn starfish arms. Eat some, and they regenerate. Eat some more, and there they are again! I swear. I don’t understand. BUT it’s ok because now I’ve found the best way to devour them all. Each. Little. Tiny. One. 

This is easy peasy. Ready?

1. Take some leftover cooked chickpeas. Salted is ok, but no garlic, onions, or other flavors. Rinse and dry them really well. I used about 3 cups worth for this recipe. (Feel free to use canned chickpeas, too. Two cans should do. Make sure to rinse and dry as well.)

2. Lay them all out on a parchment-lined sheet tray. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

3. Roast for 30 minutes, giving them a shimmy every 10 minutes to avoid burning on one side.

4. Remove from oven and let cool on the sheet tray. Bring the temp in the oven up to 325 degrees F.

5. While the chickpeas are cooling, melt 1/4 cup coconut oil in the microwave or over the stovetop on low.

6. Add in 2 tbsp brown sugar (we make our own using cane sugar and blackstrap molasses), 2 tsp cinnamon, and 1 tbsp of maple syrup to the warmed and melted coconut oil. 

7. Whisk this mixture together once the coconut oil is melted, drizzle it over the chickpeas, and toss. Make sure each little chickpea gets some love.

8. Put them back in the oven and roast at 325 degrees F for 10 more minutes. 

9. Remove from the oven, and sprinkle with a pinch of kosher or sea salt. Himalayan salt would work, too. Let cool completely. 

10. If you haven’t eaten them all by now, transfer these sweet, maple-y, cinnamonn-y, and salty chickpeas of love to an air tight container. I’d eat them within a few days (if you can refrain that long.)

See? That’s it. No more wasted chickpeas. Hurray!

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Baby Greens & Roasted Beet Salad

  
The busier I get, the more simply I find myself eating. I keep certain staples on hand, and, these days (and with the abundance of fresh organic produce Asheville and western NC has to offer) it’s lots of roasted veggies. Beets are one of my favorites, and they star in this super healthy salad. 
Ingredients:

  • organic baby greens (they’re all good, so take your pick)
  • thinly sliced onion
  • roasted beets, chilled and cut in bite sized pieces
  • raw pecans, chopped
  • balsamic vinaigrette (see below)
  • drizzle of sriracha (optional)

Method:

Add all ingredients to the bowl, and use your judgment for how much of each you want. My only recommendation is to make sure you have plenty of greens to balance out the other things. Oh, and don’t overdress the salad! Go slowly and mix gently as to not badly bruise the greens. 

Balsamic Vinaigrette:

  • 1 cup good olive oil
  • 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon cracked black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon honey or agave (for vegan option)
  • 2 cloves minced garlic

Method:

Combine all ingredients in a mason jar or other tightly lidded vessel and shake, shake, shake. Refrigerate leftovers. (By the way, this dressing is a super marinade.)

See how easy that was? Now you’ll know what to do with those leftover beets. Happy and healthy eating!

Fresh Jalapeños: We can pickle that!

I’ve never looked at a basket of garden-fresh organic jalapeños and thought “Mmmm…I’d love to gnaw on those!” So when I was gifted with some uber-spicy jalapeños from my friend at the farmers market, there was only one option: pickling. These are great for perking up a sandwich, sprinkling on nachos, or serving on top of a steaming bowl of chili.

This is such a simple process as this isn’t a proper canning. But it’s great and so very quick!

You’ll need:

  • 1 pound fresh jalapeño peppers
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 cup white vinegar
  • 4 tablespoons sugar
  • 3 tablespoons kosher or sea salt
  • 4 garlic cloves, peeled

Cut one pound of fresh, washed jalapeños in rings.

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Soak the rings in a bowl of cold water. Swish around with a long-handled utensil every now and then as this will help some of the seeds fall to the bottom. Please don’t do this with your hands and then touch your eyes! Gently scoop out the pepper rings without getting the seeds that have fallen to the bottom and transfer to another vessel.

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In a non-reactive saucepan, combine the water, vinegar, garlic cloves, salt, and sugar together and bring to a boil. Add the drained jalapeños to the pot.

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Cover with a lid and let sit for 15 minutes off the heat.

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Transfer to your favorite jar and keep in the refrigerator. They’ll last for quite some time even though they’re not properly canned.

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The Long and Winding Road: Saying Goodbye to Cottage Law

Entrepreneurship: I don’t think that there’s another place where uncertainty and confidence meet with such gusto. I never understood how my father has been both an uber successful business owner for so long while being someone who’s able to sleep at night. Being responsible for everything is scary. I know that. But I’m doing it anyway.

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Moving Happy-Go-Lucky Granola from a steady Cottage Law business to one that’s fully licenced and able to distribute has been a bumpy road. I’ve learned more than I ever expected, but, then again, I never expected to find such success doing just one farmer’s market a week. I’ve been the “granola girl” at the Downtown Farmer’s Market in Daytona Beach for just four months.

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Starting the business was a whim, a moment to try something new, and I wasn’t sure that it would end up well. But, much to my surprise, it has. Happy-Go-Lucky Granola has oodles of regular weekly customers that come for their favorite flavors, unique seasonal flavors that draw market-goers to the stand, and a colorful chalkboard that allows customers to 86 any flavor that they purchase the last of. I sell out most weeks.

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At first, our baking process was clunky. We purchased the organic ingredients in small quantities from our local health food store, Love Whole Foods. We always had to run to the store; we were always short of something; we always forgot to get this or that. Now, we purchase in eco-friendly bulk, we inventory weekly, and even make bi-monthly trips to Costco for certain items we can’t get in bulk at Love’s.

My boyfriend and I have honed our prep and baking process to the point that our kitchen is like a well-choreographed musical complete with singing, dancing, and theatrics. We know our parts, communicate well, and sway to the sound of our favorite tunes. Heat, mix, fold, line, bake, rotate, cool, cut, store…it’s the rhythm of our lives most evenings of the week.

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And now it’s time to grow. I’ve been studying the Food Safety Management Principles guide in preparation for the exam, and I’m anxious.

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I want to do well. I want to pass, get my commissary inspected, figure out how to make granola on a larger scale, and distribute (*fingers crossed*) to stores and cafes. I want, more than anything, to see Happy-Go-Lucky Granola become a smashing success – and not just at the farmers market.

Wish me luck, friends, as I travel along this bumpy road. Send Happy-Go-Lucky thoughts my way as I bake, sell, and repeat.

Until next time,

Jenna

“…gonna kick it root down!”

It’s Fiesta Friday, and The Novice Gardener throws a wicked party! I’m wearing a leopard baby doll dress, hot pink jelly shoes, three slap bracelets, and the biggest Aqua Net bang wave you’ve ever seen. And what’s more is that the Beastie Boys “Root Down” is bumping in the background. I’m partying like it’s 1994. And, my friends, this song is the inspiration for these roasted, locally-grown golden beets. I hope my bangs don’t catch on fire.

Look, there’s a party goin’ on, and I don’t want to waste this outfit in the kitchen. This recipe is a quick and dirty one, so I’ll be flirting with the cute boy in one-strapped overalls and a Kangol bucket hat in no time. See him over there drinking a Zima? He’s all mine.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound golden beets
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • Large pinch of sea salt
  • Cracked black pepper to taste

Method:

Peel and quarter the beets.

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Toss all ingredients in a non-stick oven-safe vessel.

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Roast for 30 minutes in a 375 degree oven until the beets start caramelizing.

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That’s it! Sweet, tender, earthy, sexy beets. These root veggies have my heart, and the simpler they’re prepared, the better.

Now where’s that cutie? Oh no, really?!? He left with the girl in the cropped velour blazer and high-waisted Bongo jeans? Seriously? Oh, I get it. She drives a Miata.

Who wants the next dance? The Beastie Boys are on again, and it’s totally my song!

My Secret Life as a Granola Pusher

Happy Fiesta Friday, everyone! My name is Jenna, I own Happy-Go-Lucky Granola, and my Fridays are crazy. For the past two months, I’ve baked lots and lots of vegan and organic granola products for the City Island Farmer’s Market in Downtown Daytona Beach, Florida. Happy-Go-Lucky Granola is my pride and joy. It’s also a source of near exhaustion, but, friends, I wouldn’t trade it for the world. It’s my hectic, yet amazing, reality.

These are my granola bars…

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This was my first day at the market (and things have changed a lot since then)…

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These are my friends that come to buy, nosh, and chat…

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This is my happy-go-lucky life.

Happy Fiesta Friday, friends,

Jenna

Pretty Purple Vegan Cabbage Slaw

Being a foodie definitely has its perks. I’m often the recipient of food stuff that friends purchase and realize they’ll never use. Gold beets? Sure. Twenty pounds of AP flour? Absolutely. Stunning head of magenta-colored cabbage? Bring it on.

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This cabbage, my friends, is the reason for this rainbow-colored vegan delight. It couldn’t be any easier of a recipe, and any excuse to use a mandolin slicer just about makes my day. It could also be adapted for the paleo diet if you nix the salt and sugar. Truth be told, the veggies probably have enough sweetness on their own, but I really dig the sweet/tangy flavor combo, so I do it up with no shame. And the salt is essential for helping the other flavors pop.

Ready for this? Don’t blink.

Ingredients:

  • half head purple cabbage, roughly chopped
  • half yellow bell pepper, julienned
  • half green bell pepper, julienned
  • one large carrot, thinly sliced
  • half sweet onion, thinly sliced
  • 1.5 teaspoons sea salt
  • cracked black pepper to taste
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon celery seed
  • 1/4 cup canola oil
  • 1/3 cup white vinegar

Method:

Mix all ingredients together in a large bowl. Fold to incorporate the wet and dry items together. Refrigerate for at least two hours.

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There. Done.

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Happy and healthy eating, my friends,

Jenna

Garlicky and Lemony No-Fail Kale

This stuff isn’t just a garnish, people. (…although I admittedly used to think so.) If Popeye only knew about this super veggie, he’d be singing a different song…one that rhymes with kale. I understand why kale recipes are everywhere. This leafy relative of broccoli and cauliflower is easy to prepare, can be eaten raw or cooked, is very versatile, and is loaded with oodles of vitamins and minerals. And did I mention it’s delicious?

Last night, I was tuckered out. I spent five hours gardening (not the casual, flower-picking, clean fingernail kind of gardening either). I hauled bags of soil, turned compost, pulled impossible weeds, planted flowers, sewed seeds, potted up, and then had to put all the stuff away. Dinner was the last thing I wanted to do, but we gotta eat, right?

I ended up making seared tiger prawns with Israeli couscous and (drumroll, please) kale. But ignore the first two parts of this meal; the kale stole the show. Fresh lemon, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, red pepper flakes, and sea salt turned this sturdy green veggie into a robust, bright, melt-in-your-mouth, amazing side dish. What’s more is that it took less than five minutes to make.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound organic kale, roughly chopped
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced (click here for a time saving tip)
  • juice from half a lemon
  • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 cup water

Method:

Place olive oil and garlic in a large skillet. Bring heat to medium.

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Add the chopped kale to pan and give a good stir.

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Add the water and place the lid on the pan. This will help steam and soften the kale.

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Cut a fresh lemon and enjoy the smell.

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Remove the lid after about a minute and squeeze the lemon juice into the pan (avoiding the seeds). Also add the red pepper flakes and sea salt. Stir again.

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Once the majority of the water has evaporated, the kale is done. Magical, isn’t it?

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Taste and adjust the seasonings as necessary.

That’s it. That’s really all. I promise.

Happy and healthful eating, everyone!

Some Bunny is Happy…

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…and that bunny is me. A couple of weeks ago, I posted about teeny, tiny carrots. Now I’m going to bestow you with a warm and fuzzy, so brace yourself. My mom and aunt, who happen to be adorable identical twins, we’re visiting from South Florida, and they know I love, love, love to garden. While they were getting the nickel tour, my mom picked one of the carrots and practically had a giggle fit over it. So, regardless of whether they (the carrots, not the twins) were ready or not, it was time for them to be harvested. I wanted to pick the crop of Short and Sweets…together. Why? Because my grandpa, their father, was an organic gardener back in the 50s (and even subscribed to Organic Gardening magazine) way before organic was en vogue. I knew this would bring back happy memories. And it did.

This could be one of my favorite family moments. While we may have pulled a lot of tasty carrots, nothing will compare to the memories we’ve made.

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As always, happy gardening, my friends.

– Jenna

A Carrot’s a Carrot, No Matter How Small…

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I always look forward to walking around the garden when I get home from work. It’s my daily ritual. It lifts me up; it’s what saves most of my days. I reconnect with nature and breathe. And sometimes, I get to pick a little something delicious right from the soil. Today was one of those days.

Just before dark, I saw the most precious little carrot top sticking out of the dirt and gave the greens a yank. And wouldn’t you know it? There was a 2″ tangerine-colored carrot under all that green! You see, we started these seeds in mid-October and swore they’d never amount to anything. After all, the location of the bed is less than ideal during the winter months. Saying it gets three hours of sun might be a generous estimate. So we didn’t expect much. But the tops kept growing and were the most perfect emerald green. We pushed on. It paid off.

These little guys may only be 2″ long, but they’re delicious and all ours. Perhaps the length is due to them being “Short and Sweets.” Perhaps it’s due to the lack of sun. Perhaps we just stink at growing carrots. No matter, any gardening endeavor that ends in edible and delicious organic veggies is a success.

Happy winter gardening, my friends,

Jenna